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Tag: novel structure

5 Newbie Mistakes that Will KILL a Perfectly Good Story

We all make mistakes, especially when learning anything new. Writing is not immune to process. Contrary to popular belief, writing great stories is HARD. It takes time, devotion, training, mentorship, blood, sacrifice and the willingness to make a ton of mistakes. This means countless hours and probably years of practice (which also means writing a …

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Character Building: How Story Forges, Refines, and Defines Characters

I put in a lot of work and study when it comes to honing my writing skills. This means I’m always searching for ways to become a stronger author and craft teacher. Want to get better at anything? Look to those who are the best at what they do and pay close attention. This said, …

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How to Write a Story from the Ending: Twisted Path to Mind-Blowing End

Now that we’ve discussed the Big Boss Trouble Maker who creates the core story problem in need of resolution, we’re going to tackle…endings. When we authors know our story ending ahead of time, we gain major creative advantage. What is this madness? How can I know the END? Calm down. I’ve been there, too. Which …

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Problems: Great Dramatic Writing Draws Blood & Opens Psychic Wounds

Problems are the essential ingredient for all stories. All forms of dramatic writing balance on the fulcrum of problems. The more problems, the better. Small problems, big problems, complicated problems, imagined problems, ignored problems all make the human heart beat faster. Complication, quandaries, distress, doubt, obstacles and issues are all what make real life terrifying…and …

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The Brain Behind the Story: The Big Boss Troublemaker (BBT)

Last post in our structure series, I introduced the core antagonist, what I call the Big Boss Troublemaker. The BBT is our central opposition. This is the force responsible for creating the core story problem in need of resolution. While stories have all sorts of ‘antagonists’ we’ll get to them another time. In fact, buckle …

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