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Tag: writing business

Barnes & Noble SOLD: Goliath has Fallen & What This Means for Writers

Now that a hedge fund has acquired Barnes and Noble (and its debt), this is a seriously tenuous time. They wouldn’t be the first giant beheaded by the PE (Private Equity) sword. Writers? Remain vigilant.

Irrefutable Law of Success #4—Give People What They Want to Consume

One of the reasons I emphasize understanding the craft of writing is that novel/story structure is mythic. There is actually evidence that narrative structure is hardwired into the human brain. Yes, we can break rules and deviate, but we do this too much? We confuse the reader. It’s like serving them a blue steak. Blue steak could taste great, but our minds won’t let us eat and enjoy something so very wrong.

Irrefutable Law of Success #2—Plan Your Work, Then Work Your Plan

For some writers, success means a certain level of income. Others? Awards or best-seller lists. Some writers just have a dream of finishing a work they can hold in their hands and maybe pass onto grandkids. Whatever success might mean to each of you, you have to be honest so you can build the correct foundation for your plan.

The Single Best Way to Sell a Lot of Books

Price is no longer as big of a determining factor as it used to be. A couple years ago, John Locke started the .99 bandwagon and many authors jumped on. At first readers were excited, until they realized the slush pile had just been dumped onto their Kindles and Nooks. This is good news and bad news. Bad news? Being cheap isn’t the game-changer it used to be. Good news? People are gravitating to higher priced books, because there is a presumption of higher quality. This means good books can make more money. Yay!