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Tag: fear

FEAR: Why Humans Crave Stories That Disturb Them

Fear is, in all likelihood, the single most complex human emotion. Our fears can keep us up at night, but they can also be the only thing that keeps us alive. They can save us, strangle us, liberate us or even destroy us. Like fire, fear can be mesmerizing and for sound reasons. We understand …

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Truth: The Door Between Our Greatest Fears & Our Greatest Selves

We’ve likely all heard the phrase, The truth shall set you free. Truth is critical in all areas of life, yet we’re often afraid—okay, terrified—of truth. It’s dismally human to eschew truth because truth often hurts. A lot. Truth and pain are inseparable, which is why great authors (or great people in general) are probably masochists. …

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The Coup, Day 3 – Putting the Bite in Sex Scenes

It’s Day 3 of the The Coup! This post was supposed to go up yesterday, but between unexpected doctor appointments for myself (I’m fine, but my shoulder is gonna take about 5-8 weeks to heal), my 9th wedding anniversary (we forgot until Facebook reminded us LOL), and an unexpected Denny Basenji vet visit (he’s fine, …

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FEAR—Is the Mind-Killer in Control of Your Life?

The single greatest challenge you will face in trying to accomplish anything great is FEAR. FEAR is nothing to be underestimated and we need to learn to manage it if we want to succeed. I remember being a kid and Dune was one of my favorite movies. At the age of ten I memorized Paul Atreides’ …

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Asking "What If?" & Exploring the Unknown–A Final Word on Writing Horror

Fear is the most important tool in any writer’s toolbox. Fear is the beating heart of conflict, no matter the genre. Fear of death. Fear of losing love, not finding love, not recognizing love. Fear of change. Fear of remaining the same. In Cormac McCarthy’s Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novella “The Road”, the story was less about a fear of death and more about the fear of survival at the expense of one’s humanity. In “The Joy Luck Club”, Amy Tan explores the fear of continuing generational curses.