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Category: Writing Tips

Les Edgerton Shows How to Write Amazing Dialogue–Part 2 AN EXERCISE

I hope you guys enjoyed Les’s guest post yesterday. Today, Les is offering a bonus…an EXERCISE to help you develop your skills for writing killer dialogue. Take it away, Les! Exercise on Subtext This exercise is primarily for the teacher teaching basic writing principles, although perhaps even more advanced writers may get something out of …

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Les Edgerton Shows How to Write Amazing Dialogue–Part 1

Dialogue is one of the most crucial elements of good fiction writing. For many of us, it’s also one of the toughest skills to master. Some writers have an instinct for writing great dialogue, but for others it takes hard work to achieve believable and interesting dialogue. But, no matter if it comes naturally to you or if you have to work long and hard to be able to create convincing dialogue, it can be achieved by almost everyone.

The Clock is Ticking—5 Tips for Tighter, Cleaner Writing

Time is our enemy. Most people don’t have enough. This is why our writing must be tight, direct and hook early. Modern audiences have the attention span of a toddler hopped up on 2 liters of Coke. We can’t afford to let them drift. Drift=Bad juju I’ve edited countless books, many from new authors. I …

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Writing Tip #3–Talent is Cheaper than Table Salt

I’ve been working as a professional editor, writer, ferret-herder for twelve years now, and one thing I’ve learned is that talent is highly overrated (which is why this quote by Stephen King remains one of my all-time favorites). I constantly meet writers more talented than I am, but I know they won’t make it despite …

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Writing Tip #1–How Much Detail Should Writers Use?

Lesson When it comes to writing great fiction, less is often more. Think of modifiers and detail like perfume. Perfume can be lovely, sexy, attractive, and make one irresistible. It can also give others a headache or an asthma attack and have them looking for the closest bookmark exit. Action Comb through your prose and …

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